The Intelligence – Dec 2012

SAMSUNG_XMAS

UPDATE>> Competition Winner! The winner of December’s THE INTELLIGENCE is SIMON ATHERTON . Congratulations, Simon, we’ll be in contact soon to ship your prize over.

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It’s Christmas! This quarters sponsor of the Intelligence is Samsung Semiconductors – the prime supporter of the OSPT Alliance. And take a look at the picture on the left to see what you can win each month from October to December this year! Pretty cool (if we say so ourselves!).

Now let’s look at the subject matter for this months Intelligence quiz.

The CIPURSE™ Open Security Standard

The CIPURSE™ open security standard promises to improve the performance and strengthen the security of public transit applications, as well as increase the availability of multiple sources for chip products. CIPURSE is designed to address the need of local and regional transit authorities for future-proof fare collection systems with better security than current systems. These systems will enable the public to use a single payment device–a simple, standalone ticket, multi-application card, microSD card, or NFC mobile phone– seamlessly across several modes of transportation in different locations –even different regions and systems.

Current transit fare collection systems often use proprietary Mifare Classic technology. However, the security of this technology has been compromised, creating demand by transit agencies for advanced security solutions based on open standards. CIPURSE uses AES128. The open AES encryption scheme has been thoroughly tested and is widely accepted. AES was selected by the German Federal Office for Information Security (BSI, http://www.bsi.de) and is also used by the U.S. Government, including the National Security Agency (NSA). CIPURSE also employs an advanced authentication scheme designed to withstand electronic attacks without requiring dedicated hardware. A unique design allows all applications , from low-end limited-use tickets to high value cards such as multi-application cards or NFC devices that combine payment with transit fare applications, to benefit from the same security concept and unique security advantages. In addition, product development can be cost optimized across the entire range.

CIPURSE builds on current proven open standards–the ISO 7816 Smart Card Standard, AES128, and the ISO/IEC 14443-4 protocol layer. CIPURSE is available to all industry stakeholders under fair, reasonable, and nondiscriminatory terms. And finally, CIPURSE is governed by the OSPT Alliance, which is an open and not-for profit industry association. The use of open standards promotes vendor neutrality, enables cross-vendor system interoperability, reduces technology adoption risks, improves quality, and improves market responsiveness. As a result, transit system operators have a wide range of application choices, lower operating costs, and greater flexibility.

CIPURSE is form-factor independent and designed to be used in smart cards, NFC mobile phones, and other devices. Because CIPURSE defines only a minimum feature set, implementers are free to add functionality to their products as long as interoperability is unaffected. Adoption of CIPURSE by NFC-enabled devices such as microSD cards, mobile phones, and other consumer electronics devices is expected to be a major driver for CIPURSE.

CIPURSE is intended to be a highly efficient, flexible, and secure standard for the transit market. The founding partners have defined those portions of the standard that are initially necessary for a transit system, e.g., IC functionality with its security core concept. The OSPT Alliance will expand the standard in work groups defining (for example) personalization and life cycle management and system requirements. Technology providers can add peripheral functionality to differentiate their products in the marketplace and provide stakeholders with greater choice; participation by Alliance members in work groups and other bodies will ensure that CIPURSE continues to evolve to meet the needs of the industry.

This quarter, we are giving away a new Galaxy S3 from Samsung every month, and who wouldn’t want one of those? To get one, all you have to do is answer five simple questions – the answers are in the article above (we don’t want to make it too hard!) These questions are easy – just take your time and read carefully.

And so on to the questions; (Answers in Bold)

Q1. How will CIPURSE benefit stakeholders in the mass transit market? 

  1. The CIPURSE open security standard will ensure that every first non-contact will be a pleasant and peaceful one.
  2. The CIPURSE open security standard promises to improve performance, strengthen security, increase multiple sources for chip products and secure future-proof fare collection systems for local and regional transit authorities.
  3. The CIPURSE open security standard will enable stakeholders to improve performance through true ‘drag and drop’ performance in terms of location-based marketing.

Q2. How does CIPURSE compare to current proprietary solutions? 

  1. The CIPURSE solution requires the use of dilithium. Other proprietary solutions do not use such material and may require specific programming. Other proprietary solutions also do not demonstrate a high degree of security; this is usually sacrificed in order to achieve a generous form factor.
  2. CIPURSE uses open AES encryption (AES128) and employs an advanced authentication scheme designed to withstand electronic attacks without requiring dedicated hardware. The unique design allows all applications to benefit from the same security concept and unique security advantages.
  3. Only developers well conversed in Swordfish and Jackmann++ programming languages will be able to achieve AES encryption levels for CIPURSE.

3. What are the benefits of an open approach such as CIPURSE? 

  1. CIPURSE builds on current proven open standards, thereby promoting vendor neutrality, enables cross-vendor system interoperability, reduces technology adoption risks, improves quality, and improves market responsiveness.
  2. Using CIPURSE a user can gain an unfair advantage in the Kobayashi Maru scenario.
  3. Using open standards for CIPURSE technology allows transporter operators to get a better ‘lock’ on their subjects when travelling on public transportation systems.

4. Will CIPURSE support next-generation technologies such as Near Field Communication? 

  1. No. CIPURSE is designed to be used only in a DS9 environment.
  2. Yes. CIPURSE is form-factor independent and designed to be used in smart cards, NFC mobile phones, and other devices. CIPURSE defines only a minimum feature set and so implementers are free to add functionality to their products as long as interoperability is unaffected.
  3. There is no agreement at the moment but further discussion may see support for NFC technology being taken on board.

5. How will CIPURSE continue to evolve? 

  1. CIPURSE is intended to be a highly efficient, flexible, and secure standard for the transit market and the founding partners have defined those portions of the standard that are initially necessary for a transit system, e.g., IC functionality with its security core concept. The OSPT Alliance will expand the standard in work groups defining (amongst others) personalisation, life cycle management and system requirements.
  2. There are no plans for the continued evolution of the CIPURSE standard
  3. Plans are in place to evolve the standard every six weeks on a regular basis.

Enter now!

Feel like entering? No problem. You can simply send us an email using the form below.

In the main message section simply put the question numbers and the right answers in the email e.g. Q1-3, Q2-1, etc…

Easy. You will then be added to the prize draw and your chance to win a fantastic SAMSUNG Galaxy SIII.

Good Luck!

Further reading;

CIPURSE™ is a registered trademark of the OSPT Alliance